Tag Archives: mental health

Lazz Ozerden

Born in Hungary in 1975, Lazz now lives in north London, and has done so for over 12 years. He is currently studying, whilst working on his paintings, writing poetry and dreaming.

A few words from Lazz himself…

“I have been diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder, but it’s just a cheap sticker on my forehead, just like on all of us who carry  a white light and dark smoke around this town.

For me, the canvas is the place to scream into, just like into a night sky, the lover to make love with, the runaway place, the shadow in the dark that brings me light and makes me free. I paint mainly to get rid of my demons or dream about “THE WOMEN”.

My paintings are acrylic on canvas, which I apply with a variety of techniques. ”

Although Lazz does not have a website at the moment, he is contactable through Facebook and is keen to find his paintings a happy home. If you are interested in buying work by Lazz, please do not hesitate to send us an email at Mental Spaghetti, and we can put him in touch with you. Lazz is also keen to show his work in exhibitions.

 

Workshop: John Hegley creative writing & drawing

Spaghetti & The Yeti: 3 hour creative writing & drawing workshop – 15/05/15 – Buy tickets

A LIMITED NUMBER OF FREE TICKETS AVAILABLE TO MENTAL HEALTH SERVICE USERS – EMAIL US HERE

Mental Spaghetti, the art and creativity in mental health organisation, joins forces with Free Space Gallery to celebrate Mental Health Awareness Week 2015 with a drawing and creative writing workshop from poet and comedian, Mr John Hegley!

“John Hegley is a regular sell-out at The Edinburgh Festival. He has performed at the Montreal Comedy Festival, the USA Comedy Festival in Aspen, with Ulrika Jonsson & Anita Dobson in The Pyjama Game and on BBC R4’s Hearing With Hegley.

John Hegley is widely known as one of the country’s most innovative comic poets with several best-selling volumes of poetry to his name.”

A 3 hour creative arts session with John (with a 30 minute break), expect talking, laughing, thinking and drawing! We provide the materials, you provide yourselves. The rest is a surprise!
Please note workshop times: 2pm for 2:30pm start, 3:15pm 30 minute break (refreshments provided), 6pm finish.

There is a gallery at the venue, and Mental Spaghetti/Free Space Gallery organisers and artists will be around for a while after the workshop if you’d like to chat and view any work on show.
More info about John Hegley: http://www.johnhegley.co.uk/

John has just embarked on his Spring/Summer tour so catch these potatoes while they’re hot!*

Facebook event page

*(hint: that’s a nod to his now-touring show, New & Selected Potatoes, tickets here: http://www.johnhegley.co.uk/thistour/index.htm)

Brought to you by http://www.mentalspaghetti.org & http://freespacegallery.org/

The Daily Life Ltd needs YOU!

Our friends and comrades in art and mental health, The Daily Life Ltd, led by Bobby Baker (not a man), have launched a Kickstarter campaign to raise money for 3 new animations starring Dr Bobby, Roxy and Rudi. Together they will spread the word about their fantastic arts & mental health programme.

Can you help? Here follows a short broadcast from Dr Bobby…

And now some more information from the Daily Life Ltd. team…
Hello! Team Daily Life Ltd here – thanks for stopping by. We’re an arts organisation based in Stratford, East London. Our Artistic Director, Bobby Baker, is well known as an artist and as an ‘expert by experience’ of the mental health system. Our whole mission is to create powerful art that changes the way people think about mental health. We want as many people as possible to see surprising and beautiful work by artists with personal experience of mental health issues – and we need your help.

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About this project: who we are and what we do…


The Roxy and Rudi Roadshow Local Wellbeing Research Unit, Shuffle Festival (2013) Photograph: Hydar Dewachi

Having produced Bobby’s art for years, we are now beginning to present work by many more artists who have lived experience of mental distress. This year we’ve raised money to tour exciting work by a group of talented poets, performers, artists and musicians in East London.

Here are some of our amazing lineup:


Selina Thompson, Chewing the Fat (2014)


Laura Jane Dean, This Room (2015)


Simon Raven, Cool Party (2014)

We’ll also be presenting work by artists from the wonderful Outside In at Pallant House Gallery and Bethlem Gallery:

Bethlem Gallery website. Screenshot: February 2015


Outside In National, Pallant House Gallery, Chichester (2012) Photograph: Jason Hedges

We’re touring to East London venues like the pioneering Bromley By Bow Centre, Kingsley Hall, Shuffle Festival, and Queen Mary University, London.
Plus we’re planning another stunning Lightbox installation this autumn, building on the success of exhibition in Dalston last year – but this time in Newham.


The Expert View, Lightbox installation, Dalston Square (2014) Photograph: Andrew Whittuck

What we want to do now – with your help
The art is all sorted, as you can see, but now we need to make sure people know about it – locally and online. We’re a minuscule company, so we’re asking for your support to pay for our creative collaborators (Kate Bland, Cast Iron Radio, Pete Baynton, Radish Pictures, Bobby Baker aka ‘Dr Bobby,’) to help develop three more ‘Promo Cartoons.’

Thanks to Pete, Kate and the rest of our collaborators working with Bobby, our tiny, terrific and talented Roxy and Rudi Marketing Team have already been on the road on their mission to SAVE HUMANITY! Check them out on YouTube. As well as promoting new work, the cartoons are also a way of recording our activities and sharing them with people far beyond our East London stomping ground – Roxy, Rudi and Dr Bobby are a multitasking team!

A bit of background information

For those of you who don’t know us yet, and why we have such a passion for the arts and mental health, here’s a word from our Artistic Director Bobby Baker, aka ‘Dr Bobby:’


Bobby Baker, How to Shop (1993) Photograph: Andrew Whittuck

“Hello! I’m an artist and the Artistic Director of Daily Life Ltd. We’re a small Arts Council funded arts organisation based in East London.

I’ve been an artist for 40 years or so, making lots of work about daily life, being a woman, bringing up children, power, that sort of thing …How to change the world, basically.
Between 1997-2008 I had a period of serious mental ill health. I made lots of work about this experience. I had all sorts of treatment – some of it good – and in the end I got better. I’m now proud to describe myself as an expert by experience of the mental health system, and I’ve been Tip Top up Top for a decade or more. But there’s a lot of ignorance, fear and prejudice about mental health out there. This affected me very badly and still does, as it does others. Mental health is a subject that provokes strong feelings – people can get shouty, or boring, or bored or even more confused.

So that’s where the art comes in!

We know that powerful art changes lives and transforms thinking. We want more people to see great work by many people – many more voices, many experiences. We’d love your support to make the The Roxy and Rudi Roadshow Cartoons, so we can promote our fantastic 2015 programme to a wider audience.”

-Thanks, Bobby!


Bobby Baker, Pull Yourself Together, Trafalgar Square, London (2000) Photograph: Hugo Glendinning

Okay, folks, final word from team Mental Spaghetti – go help our buddies Bobby Baker and The Daily Life Ltd. raise what they need to animate their adventures! Thank you!

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Where is the Work in the Work of Art?

Opening Event: 19 February, 3 – 5pm
Exhibition continues: 20 February – 10 April
Opening times: Wed – Friday, 10am – 5pm
Gallery and museum open the first and last Saturdays of the month 10am – 5pm

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“A pioneering arts and museum space at the heart of Bethlem Royal Hospital opens to the public on February 19th. Where is the Work in the Work of Art? is our first exhibition in the new gallery. This inaugural exhibition reveals some of the stories, processes and structures behind the art of a diverse group of artists who are connected to the gallery. We will be asking: what takes place before, during and after the making of an artwork? And how are artists enabled to do what they do?

Where is the Work in the Work of Art? takes its lead from our recent Bethlem Salon by the same name. It looks at art’s relationship to labour from several perspectives: cultural theory, art practice and occupational therapy. The aim is to reach beyond art as an object and identify what might be called the ‘bi-products’ of the art process.

What work is for artists and what it could be has been of long debate. Do we consider the making of art to be work when that work is enjoyable? Is it work when the outcome does not take the form of a tangible finished object? Is it work when the work is of second nature to the artist and fully integrated into daily life? Or does the work lie in the minds of the audience, who after encountering the artwork, carry into the world with them new ideas, questions, feelings or forms?

When asked about the title for his recent exhibition at the Bethlem Gallery, The silence of sawn wood, artist P.J Baird said: “It indicates a happening, a poetic image. As you view the work you imagine the process involved, like a form of synesthesia.” Although often seen as a strictly controlled environment to reside in, the hospital can be an enabling context for the production of art; artists may have more time and freedom to work. When it comes to the reception and interpretation of artwork, the hospital context is much more problematic.

Artworks and works of art are predominantly discussed as finished objects viewed through the valorising contexts of galleries and museums. This exhibition looks at work that is not always visible, work that is present in process, failure, experimentation, advocacy and the many other aspects of work that forms and surrounds artistic practice. By making visible some of the usually unseen aspects of artists practice, we hope to give further weight to the work of some of the most dynamic, adaptable, resistant and innovative artists that we know.”

- Sam Curtis, Curator

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The exhibition programme offers several lenses through which to consider artist practice and specific works:

Encounter and dialogue
What kind of encounter takes place between an audience and artists practice? How do artists set up situations for dialogue whether intentionally or unintentionally?

Working under constraints
Whether it’s within the rigorously controlled environment of a psychiatric hospital or the limiting space of home, the exhibition looks at how these artists adapt and evolve their practices to survive and flourish within specific constraints.

Art as a tool
The exhibition will explore how some of the artists use art as a personal tool, arming their practice with a specific use- value, a function in the artists ability to craft his or her own identity.

Methodology and process
Uncovering some of the complex and refined methodologies and processes of artists can tell us something about their focus, their skill and their persistence.

Time
Does more time devoted to making art have a positive effect on an artist’s practice? The Bethlem Gallery acknowledges the importance of time, how time aids the establishing of mutual relationships of trust and respect with artists and the creation of a safe space where together we can experiment artistically.

Support Structures
How are artists enabled to continue practising? What support structures, both formal and informal create the specific conditions for their practise to take place?

Where is the Work in the Work of Art? features:
• Contributions by Albert, Clive, Dan Duggan, Daniel, George Harding, Liz Atkin, Matthew, Max Reeves, OccupationalTherapy Department staff and patients, Patient X, P. J. Baird, Raymond, Rodney, Ronald, Roydell, Steph Bates, Sue B, and Sue Morgan.

• Interviews and documentation of artistic process

• A mapped walk around the hospital site where visitors can discover an evolving array of artist interventions and

remnants of practice.

• An artist-created Wood Library situated within the diverse woodlands on the hospital grounds, open for reading,

borrowing, referencing and workshops.

• A Workshop for Unrealised Projects where unfinished or failed projects will be collectively explored and then remade through shared proposals

• The Bethlem Salon – Making and Unmaking – where invited speakers will discuss art, making and the production of subjectivities within the context of an exhibition showing the artworks resulting from of the Workshop for Unrealised Projects

• A series of talks and workshop to be announced on the gallery website

Address: The Bethlem Gallery, Bethlem Royal Hospital, Monks Orchard Road, Beckenham, Kent BR3 3BX
Travel: Nearest British Rail: Eden Park / East Croydon

Contact: Beth Elliott, Gallery Director, 020 3228 4101 • Email: thebethlemgallery@gmail.com • Website: http://www.bethlemgallery.com

Update from Bethlem Gallery

On the 19th of February, The Bethlem Gallery and Museum will open the doors to a new, state of the art building which will be home to the Bethlem Gallery, Bethlem Museum of the Mind and Bethlem archives.

Below is a summary of the first three exhibitions taking place in the building.

Bethlem Museum of the Mind’s Permanent Collection.

A selection of around 1,000 art works including works by former Bethlem patients such as Jonathan Martin, Richard Dadd and Louis Wain

Bryan Charnley: The Art of Schizophrenia

Bringing together works from the Bethlem collection and many rarely seen works from the Estate of Bryan Charnley, this exhibition looks back at Charnley’s life and work.

Where is the Work in a Work of Art?

What kind of work goes into making a work of art? This exhibition will reveal the processes, structures and systems behind the art of a diverse group of artists who are connected to the Bethlem Gallery. We’ll be asking how does identity play a role in the making and reception of an artwork and how are artists enabled to do what they do?

About Bethlem

Bethlem Royal Hospital was founded in 1247 and was the first institution in the UK to specialise in the care of the mentally ill. The hospital continues to provide in-patient care as part of the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and is a provider of mental health and substance misuse services for people locally and specialist services for people from across the U.K. For more information on our services please visit: www.slam.nhs.uk

1 in 4 people will experience a mental health problem in any given year. This is the most commonly quoted statistic, and the one which has the most research evidence to support it – www.mind.org.uk

Around 300 people out of 1,000 will experience mental health problems every year in Britain 230 of these will visit a GP 102 of these will be diagnosed as having a mental health problem 24 of these will be referred to a specialist psychiatric service

6 will become inpatients in psychiatric hospitals.

For more information visit: bethlemgallery.com | bethlemmuseumofthemind.org.uk

The Craftimation Factory – Interactive Exhibition

Interactive Exhibition With Focus On Mental Health – By Hastings Based Artists

Frames Of Mind is an exhibition that is the culmination of a year-long project during which adults with lived experience of mental health and wellbeing issues made puppets, stop motion animation and an installation with the purpose of creating dialogue around mental health. The project was led by Hastings based charity The Craftimation Factory and features work by many local artists as well as work from those living in other parts of East Sussex.

The exhibition combines interactive elements including exploring the installation with a UV torch to find hidden messages and playing cassette tapes on a retro tape player, as well a life sized knitted puppet and photos from the former psychiatric hospital in Hellingly.

The exhibition launches at 12 noon 2nd December at Towner Gallery, Eastbourne where it will run for two weeks

After the launch there is a programme of activities including free workshops and a ‘Living Exhibit’ which will invite members of the public to listen to conversations and ask questions of people with lived experience of mental health issues.

www.thecraftimationfactory.org www.facebook.com/knittedanimationworkshops

Music and Madness: Derby

On Saturday 20th September at 7.30pm, Borderline is holding ‘Music and Madness’ – a concert showcasing fantastic local musicians at St Peter’s Church, Littleover!

St Peter’s Church is a gorgeous traditional church building with fantastic acoustics. There will be a wide range of music and styles ranging from cellists to singers and from Italian arias to modern music! Amidst the music performances, there will be comical poems around the theme of madness.

What’s This For?

This is an event to raise awareness of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) and to raise money to enable Borderline to continue to carry out their work.

What Does Borderline Do?

Borderline uses the arts and creativity to raise awareness and reduce stigma surrounding Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). We do this through art exhibitions, creative workshops, theatre performances, campaigning for BPD treatment and much more.

BPD is a severe and enduring mental health condition. It is estimated that 1 in 100 people are diagnosed with BPD. Those with the condition are often stigmatised by those around them, including those working in the mental health field. (You can read more about that here).

Many people with BPD are reluctant to accept the diagnosis (and therefore the treatment on offer), due to associated stigma. This reluctance to seek treatment, or even complete reluctance to seek any help worsens the individual’s mental health and can even lead to suicide. Shocking statistics show that as many as 1 in 10 people with BPD die as a result of suicide!

But Borderline are doing all they can to change this situation and to improve the lives of those with BPD.

How do I get hold of tickets?

By coming along you will be helping us improve (and even potentially save) the lives of those with BPD! You can get your tickets online or you can pay on the door. You can book online at: http://www.borderlineart.co.uk/music-and-madness

Please email admin@borderlineart.co.uk if you would like more information or any help booking tickets.

Hope to see you there!

PS. Don’t forget to save room for pudding on Saturday night, as there will also be scrumptious homemade cakes and drinks for sale!

David Feingold

The artwork of David Feingold, diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder in 2001.

“There was a time when I tried to keep my disabilities to myself. That is, until it was nearly impossible to cover up my forgetfulness, poor organization, distractibility, and depression. I finally came out of the closet, determined to live my life to the best of my ability, with my impairments. Instead of hiding them, I embraced them. Instead of making excuses for them I prided myself in having them.”

If you would like to see more of David’s work check out his page at Bipolar Artists website.


The Bipolar Impaired Self


Look At Me, See My Pain


Seeing The Light


Hear That


Theo


Lizzy Makes Me Dizzy

Creativity and Social Support in Mental Health

Mental Spaghetti has been cited as a reference in Roberta McDonnell’s new book, ‘Creativity and Social Support in Mental Health‘.

Roberta says, “Hopefully my new book will add to the voices trying to promote positive mental health recovery and a better deal for service users. A short summary of the findings and recommendations in a free e-book will be available soon and I will be happy to forward to anyone interested. Here’s a link in the meantime to the blurb and contents.”

If you’d like to get a link for the e-book, leave a comment and I will forward your interest to Roberta.

Anxiety Arts Festival 2014

Barbican, South London Gallery, National Portrait Gallery, Freud Museum, Wigmore Hall, Dulwich Picture Gallery…
Visual art, music, dance, theatre and film

“Anxiety Arts Festival 2014 is a London-wide festival that explores the way anxiety and art interact.

From the sense of unease created by a Hitchcock film, to new commissions in music by Jocelyn Pook and art by Bonnie Camplin, leading artists explore their own anxieties and chronicle the neurosis of modern life – offering us insights into our own anxieties.

The correlation between creativity and mental illness is well documented, and the rapid social, cultural and political changes of the last century mean that anxiety is one of today’s most prevalent mental disorders. While this central aspect of our contemporary condition is reflected in the arts, this is the first time the link has been explored in detail by bringing artists together with leading mental health professionals and academics. Curated by the Mental Health Foundation, the Anxiety Arts festival questions our definitions of normality and acknowledges the creative power of anxiety through music, film, art, dance and theatre.

The Anxiety film season sees screenings at the Barbican and the Picturehouse cinemas, the National Portrait Gallery and the ICA, ranging from classic tension-builders – such as Alfred Hitchcock’s ‘The Lodger’ and Andre Tarkovsky’s ‘Solaris’ – to recent explorations of the psyche. The season gives a brief story of anxiety in cinema, revealing the roles that have given character to our anxieties, such as the hysterical housewife and the melancholy migrant. Throughout, psychologists are brought together with cinema experts and performers to get to grips with what cinema can reveal about anxiety. Rare screenings – such as Peter Robinson’s documentary about RD Laing’s radical Archway community, Asylum – will screen alongside new work looking at modern issues, including post-traumatic stress disorder and social anxieties around issues of race and home.

The Visual Arts programme explores the flexible and often contested boundaries between sanity and insanity, as well as the social and cultural anxieties associated with social labels. New commissions exhibitions, performances, residencies and artists’ films, at South London Gallery, Gasworks and BFI reflect on what is considered ‘normal’ and the associated pressure of fitting one’s subjective experiences within this frame.”

The full programme for Anxiety Arts 2014 is launched today, check it out at www.anxiety2014.org.

Mad Hatter’s Tea Party

MAD HATTER’S TEA PARTY TO REDUCE STIGMA SURROUNDING MENTAL ILLNESS

When: 2.30 – 4.30pm on Saturday 29th March /Where: Friends Meeting House, St Helens Street, Derby, DE1 3GY.
Cost: £2 for a child, and £4 for an adult 
To get your tickets, email admin@borderlineart.co.uk or just turn up on the day!

There’s an expression “as mad as a March hare”, and so it seems appropriate that Borderline chose this month to present their fund-raising pop up cafe and art installation: “The Mad Hatter’s Tea Party”.

Borderline Arts is set up to use the arts to challenge the stigma around mental illness.  They will be drawing on actors from their associated theatre group “The Raving Mad Theatre Company” to populate a lively Alice in Wonderland themed tea party which will serve tea and games to the public.

Sarah Eley, the woman behind Borderline Arts, who is herself a long term sufferer of borderline personality disorder, says, “What we aim to do through our work is show that just because a person has a mental health diagnosis it doesn’t mean that they are completely different to everyone else.  We want people to understand the ordinary beautiful everyday lives that are still lived by sufferers alongside their illness.  It is why we are a little irreverent about the whole idea of madness, we like to play with it to show that being around people who suffer mental illness doesn’t have to be serious, it can be easy to have fun.”

The Mad Hatter’s Tea Party promises Flamingo Croquet with the Red Queen, a treasure hunt to find the Door Mouse, giant flowers and toadstools, a miniature house for an overgrown Alice,  Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum carnival cutlets as well as a craft table, Wonderland props and a photo booth.  Not to mention tea with the Mad Hatter,  the Red Queen, the White Rabbit and of course Alice herself.  It sounds like a tea party you wouldn’t want to miss!

What is BPD?
BPD is a severe and complex mental health condition, which largely misunderstood and stigmatised. Amongst many other things, BPD often prevents the sufferer from working and from have stable relationships, due to the intense mood swings, chaotic thinking and destructive coping mechanisms. Although the behaviour is often seen as ‘attention seeking’, their maladaptive behaviour is actually due to their inability to manage and express feelings in a healthy way.

Is BPD Treatable?
BPD can be treated! Many people with BPD who receive appropriate treatment are able to learn to manage their emotions is a constructive way and are able to lead a productive, healthy and happy life, and often get back into employment. However, despite this, and despite the fact that 1 in 10 people with the condition commit suicide if it is left untreated, there is currently no appropriate support for those with BPD in Derby. On top of that, given the  recent extensive mental health cuts in the NHS, even the little general support that there is for those with BPD and other mental health issues is being decreased. It is inevitable that this will lead to decline in people’s mental health and even an increase in fatalities.

How is a Tea Party Improving this Situation?
The proceeds of the tea party are going to go towards the funding Borderline needs to put on a national exhibition tour of artwork created by artists who have BPD. On the tour there will also be creative workshops for the public and theatre performances. The purpose of the tour is to:
– Raise awareness of and reduce stigma surrounding BPD
– Improve relationships/understanding/communication between sufferers and carers/family members/professionals etc
– Highlight the need for appropriate BPD services in Derby and across the country
– Nurture artists with BPD, give them platform to exhibit and develop as artists and to find an artistic identity and a voice through their art as they are often isolated and do not have to confidence to do this.

To do all this, we need money, so we are holding this very exciting fundraiser to help get all this started! If you are able too come along or support us in anyway, you really would be making a difference to the lives of people with BPD as well as their families and carers. Not to mention you will have a splendid time!

How do I find out more?
Anyone interested in getting involved or in coming along should contact admin@borderlineart.co.uk  For more information about Borderline, please visit www.borderlineart.co.uk Click on ‘Latest News’ for more information about this event.

We look forward to seeing you at at The Mad Hatter’s Tea Party on 29th March at 2.30pm! Don’t be late for this very important date!