Jacob Sharpe – The Hanging Badger

Jacob Sharpe, ‘The Hanging Badger’. Fine artist and illustrator, working mainly with vinyl cut relief printing. Themes of history, mythology, horror and folklore run through Jacob’s work; my favourite pieces are his portraits, above. For more of his work, check out Jacob’s website >> www.thehangingbadger.com.

“I was diagnosed with a mental heath condition after I left university about 8 years ago but looking back I can see myself suffering from it (or elements of it) right back to my earliest years. I am an artist and have always hoped to make a living in some sort of arty way, or even just be a bit successful at it while not necessarily making a living. I predominantly work in black and white using vinyl cut relief printing and I often make use of silhouettes in my illustrations.

Recently I ventured away from my usual creative process as a way of coping better at my ‘real’ part time job (where I can feel most trapped!). I started to draw a series of self portraits in black ink on scraps of paper at certain quiet times at my desk to convey what was going on in my head when I was struggling most.

People I work with often comment on how cool, calm and collected I seem while working but in reality inside my head and through my body I am the complete opposite of relaxed. I felt a physical need to get out what was inside, I did not start the artwork with a plan I just kept putting pen to paper until I felt I had got across how horrible things were in my head at that moment. I have found this incredibly helpful, positive and uplifting to create a representation of something you can’t really ‘see’ and can’t always describe. It is a wonderful release and I find the nastier the portrait the better I feel.”
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Blinko & Neate: Unlocking Worlds

Man on cross 2017, 11.5x8.25 inches (1)
Man on Cross, Nick Blinko, 2017

Chris Neate, Consciousness of Space, Ink on board, 45x15cm
‘Consciousness of Space’, Chris Neate, 2017

 www.jenniferlaurengallery.com / www.outsiderart.co.uk

 

Siris Hill

Siris Hill is a self-taught artist whose creative practice is centred around Renaissance and Baroque inspired figurative painting. His work explores the effects of mental illness and other psychological conditions of the mind on an individual. Focusing on the struggle of perception, he depicts the beauty of individuality, but the strongest message is the struggle of trying to live. ​Siris is a digital fine artist, replicating the textures and movement of oil and acrylic paint.

“I’m Siris Hill. I’m 27. I have suffered from anxiety and depression since my late teens, and, have become somewhat agoraphobic due to the anxiety, which makes it difficult to network with other people. I sometimes find it difficult to share my work. This is caused by past rejection, anxiety about approaching people, and not feeling good enough.

I was diagnosed with Crohn’s disease at birth. I practically lived in hospitals until the age of fifteen when I decided I was sick of them mistreating me. I stopped taking my medication, and have been physically healthy ever since, although I began getting anxiety attacks due to the trauma of my childhood.

I started painting 4 years ago, as a way to relax. Since then it has become a form of meditation for me. I am self-taught and my work portrays the raw feelings and emotions felt living with mental illnesses. It might be difficult for a person living without a mental illness to understand what it’s like for me – I often feel frustrated and isolated.

I love oil painting, but I’m unable to use it due to the fumes and certain materials triggering my anxiety. I taught myself to replicate techniques of Renaissance painters such as Rembrandt. Due to the advancements in technology I’m able to replicate traditional painting almost exactly, the only difference is drying times between layers.

I use a graphics tablet which tracks the movement of a pen that I hold to paint so my hand movements are then replicated on the screen.  Other than that my process is almost exactly like Rembrandt’s, from what I’ve gathered through research at least. I build up a rough sketch to find a composition, fill in light and shadows, work in black and white to realise my forms and then glaze colours on top (although sometimes I work with colour straight away).

Painting is my way of expressing what I can’t talk about. My art may seem dark, but, I feel it reflects the reality other people like me live with day to day.”

To see more of Siris Hill’s work, please visit his website, www.sirishill.co.uk/, Instragram, and Facebook profiles. Siris recently exhibited with ten other artists living with mental ill health. Their self-curated show, Absence, can be viewed online, here.

 

Derek Collins \ D+SEA

scan0003all words and artwork, ©Derek Collins. If you would like to get in touch with Derek, please email us.

I ain’t sure if this makes sense… but I reckon “sense” is a commodity I bartered long long many moons time ago…

Am  a  epileptic ex-junkie word wranglin’
music manglin’ monad…
presentin’ these pictorial pustules…a pair of perfidious polyps
pre-thought, post-human
funnelled through the cold slops of
a broken soul
bolstered + procured by profound
isolation I place my gifts upon yr altar
all my futile generosities, straight from the
id, tremblin’ n naked on the barren shores of a post-addictive alienated consciousness…

image 1: the symptom pool

image“the Terrible Mother, the vagina dentata, the Fury, Lilith, Justine the Hag, Babylon the castrating harlot, The Venusian conspiracy…”

image 2: the girl who lived on heaven hill 

the-girl-who-lived-on-heaven-hill

“the Great Mother, the nurturing anima, The Madonna, The daughters of the heart, Christabel, Juliette, The Yin, La Femme…”

d+sea the otherorganism awaits…

I walk on mirrored angles
broken light insists
I must cross these frozen borders
and upon strange circuits
they melt but persist…

Exhibition: The Deadends, London

What: The Deadends, multidisciplinary, visual art, installation and performance
When: Open weekends 12–5pm, until March 12, 2017
Where: Studio One Gallery, 7–9 Wandsworth Plain, London SW18 1ES. Map

deadends

The Deadends – A celebration of a made-up culture

The documentary The Deadends (in search of truth) was recently shown at the ICA 100 years of Dada, giving rise to the misplaced idea that they are a made up cult rather than culture.

Bringing together the largest collection of Deadend material to date, the celebration will also include speculative enactment as well as featuring the first ever discoveries of Deadend sonic artefacts; The Deadends resonance (recently detected by Andy Barrett) with extracts from The Assemblage Brain by Tony D. Sampson https://soundcloud.com/mbg-1/deadend-resonance-2

The somnambulist critique of the Deadends has been taken as an opportunity to contextualize the radical new theories developed in Tony D. Sampson’s new book The Assemblage brain. The book unravels the conventional image of thought that underpins scientific and philosophical accounts of sense making, providing a new view of our current time in which capitalism and the neurosciences endeavour to colonise the brain.

NB: The curators have requested that visitors be aware that the Deadends would not have referred to themselves as the Deadends and that this is a convenient moniker derived from the signature shapes in the artefacts.

http://www.unlike.space
http://www.facebook.com/TheDeadendsUK
http://www.studio1gallery.co.uk

Exhibition: The Shapes & Lines of Beauty

What: Visual art exhibition, group show
When: Until Thursday 19 January 2017, Monday to Friday 9.00am to 5.00pm
Where: The Conference Centre, St Pancras Hospital, 4 St Pancras Way, London, NW1 0PE

161031 Beauty and the Beast.jpg

Ten artists explore ‘beauty’ in a group show curated by Peter Herbert and The Arts Project.

“A stunning new art exhibition on the theme of Beauty and the Beast. Service users are among the ten artists whose work will be displayed in The Shapes and Lines of Beauty, including striking images by a former soldier who received treatment at the Trust for post-traumatic stress disorder.

Shaun Cole’s work evokes the colours of the Middle East, where he served as a soldier and he credits his works’ striking use of repetitive dots, reminiscent of aboriginal art, with helping him to “bring order” to his experience of PTSD (Post-traumatic stress disorder).

The aim of this latest exhibition in St Pancras Hospital is to encourage people to consider the nature of so-called ‘beauty’ and to question pleasing appearances.

Arts Project curator, Peter Herbert, who will be displaying two of his own pieces of work, said: “This is an exhibition bursting with warmth, vigour and imagination. Ten artists have produced work celebrating ideas of beauty and covering a broad spectrum. This is a fascinating concept and one that is well worth exploring further”.

Introducing the Artists…

SYBIL ADELAJA expresses the face and body as conduits to the inner soul though obsessive line drawing scribbles, which convey real power and forceful imagination.

CHRIS BIRD’s images which use rapidograph pens to create black lines on white with red colours have been published in THE BIG ISSUE and exhibited over the years. The result is a growing body of work responding to the beautiful and confusing energy of life in the big city. Within complex patterns the artist is drawn to faces in the crowd through which he emphasises marginalised people who inhabit the daily life of our city.

EDWARD BLAKE produces work inspired by a background studying architecture. These composite creations revel in layers of frames within frames, stained glass inserts decorated with flowers, foliage and texts of a personal nature.

RUBY BRADLEY is a self taught artist who contrasts traditional and delicate still life paintings of vases/bowls of flowers with new work, which develop into more abstract impressions of line and colour.

SHAUN COLE is a former soldier who was one of the war artists featured in our earlier ‘THE WAY AHEAD’ exhibition. Here, the artist returns with a wider range of work that evokes the colours of the Middle East, where he served as a soldier. His striking use of repetitive dots, recalls aboriginal art. This is artwork that helps to bring order to the artist’s experience of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. He is currently studying for a Fine Arts degree at Ipswich University in Sussex.

MANEL GUELL is a painter who evokes the spiritual genesis of an often troubled Spanish social and artistic history. His delicate work using lines and shapes is rich with references to the surreal abstractions of Spanish artists including Goya and Luis Bunuel.

RICHARD KABY had open heart surgery after suffering a heart attack in 2014. His change in lifestyle while recovering resulted in a new awareness of the minutiae of everyday life and he was challenged to take one photo a day pasted onto Face Book in a project i flower. Using a phone camera as his eye ,the photographer discovers the nature of beauty in flowers, both as they blossom and die, depicting the fragility inherent within the cycle of our lives. Using extreme close-ups, these are photographs by an artist with an eye for the beauty around us, which most of us barely ever see.

KATHY KEEFE creates hats and head wear inspired by a love of millinery artistes of earlier decades including Treacy, Dache and Schiaparelli. For her display, the artist has created a boudoir, set against beautiful backdrops of delicately embroidered transparent lace.

ALBAN LOW has a growing collection of portraits, constructed in lines with splashes of colour to bring out the warmth and passion of musicians. These are drawn ‘live’ by the artist during his visits to the jazz cafes of London. For this exhibition, the artist is also presenting portraits of eight musicians who work with the innovatory programme Key Changes. They will perform a live set on the opening night, curated by manager Peter Leigh.

GEORGIA MATHEWS returns to the gallery for her 6th exhibition showcasing creative embellished jewellery. With this display she specialises in harmony between line, pattern and shape taking influence and inspiration from nature, colour and materials of the earth.

The exhibition includes two installations by PETER HERBERT. One is a fantasia of a carousel horse leaping through rainbow coloured hoops and a second installation involves a log lady made from the trunk of a cherry tree.

Contact details

C&I communications team: 020 3317 7236
communications@candi.nhs.uk

www.facebook.com/keychanges
www.facebook.com/theartsproject1
The Arts Project Gallery and Sales: Curator Manager Peter Herbert: 020 7916 8416
Operations Manager: Elaine Harper-Gay theartsproject1@gmail.com

A Mental Spaghetti 2016, here’s to the future!

2016, despite its infamy as a problematic and troublesome year, brought us many positives and much pleasure in the form of large scale group exhibitions, our first ‘Spaghetti School’ residency at Free Space Gallery, and working with some of our favourite comrades on exciting new projects designed to spark debate and question closed answers.

We worked as part of the Roving Diagnostic Unit (see photo, right), for Bobby Baker’s Daily Life Ltd., which saw us carrying out performances and workshops at the William Morris Gallery, Vestry House Museum and the Wellcome collection, for the Diagnosing Diagnosis symposium to accompany their latest exhibition, ‘Bedlam’. The workshops were designed to make people think about diagnosis and what it means. Our workshop, A Diagnostic Portrait of…, had participants team up to draw large scale portraits of their patients (objects in situ at Vestry House) using only character descriptors.

Our own exhibition output last year was bumper – we had a large group show to kick things off at Menier Gallery, followed by two more exhibitions in London, co-curated with The Dragon Café and Uncooked Cultures, plus a co-curated exhibition with AIMS, at the Oxford Museum and Town Hall Gallery. Over 20o artists were promoted through these exhibitions, with many of them selling work and gaining further professional exhibitions through the exposure of our shows. To date, (since 2011), we have reached an audience of over 10,000 online, shown the work of over 200 artists to a physical audience of 1,000+, and worked closely with 10 artists to mentor and support their practice.

Workshops have covered printmaking, sculpture, collage, alternative ways of drawing, and a collaboration with artist and photographer, Catriona Gray, to deliver a series of photographic mixed media workshops at Free Space Gallery, Kentish Town. The photos below show collage work, the process of lumen exposure photography, and the final outcome of combining the lumen technique with printmaking. All workshops are free, supported by the ever excellent Kentish Town Improvement Fund and Free Space Gallery. Extra support in the form of volunteers comes from Clean Break.

Collage work by Alexandra at Spaghetti School Lumen exposure photography Lumen photo exposure combined with printmaking

2017 – onwards!

First up, January 23, we have a printmaking workshop at The Dragon Café for Broken Grey Wires. If you already know the Dragon Café, you’ll know that spaces are limited, and you must be registered with them to take part. The workshop starts at 3pm.

Next, we are over the moon to be working with the young people of Snowsfield Adolescent Unit at the South London and Maudsley Hospital. Work to start in February, and while it is only open to residents at SLaM, we will report back with our artistic endeavours.

Spaghetti School will be starting again in March, and continuing in 5 week blocks throughout the year. Keep your eye on the blog for news to come!

We’ve got loads of new artists to update you with, so make sure you are following the blog and all good social media outlets (you know the ones, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram) to keep up to date with who’s doing what.

Finally, Happy New Year, everyone!