Rowan’s Cosmos

What: Art Installation Opening and Memorial for Rowan Morrall
When: Friday 20th July 2018, 1pm
Where: Recovery College, Wellbeing Centre, 3 Woburn Road, Bedford MK40 1EG
In July 2017, Mental Spaghetti, in partnership with MIND, ran a series of workshops aimed at young marginalised artists to create a collaborative outdoor art installation in memory of Rowan Morrall.

Rowan was a talented young artist who lived in Bedford. He suffered from mental health distress from his adolescence onwards, and ended his life at the age of 26.

Throughout this short time, Rowan created some beautiful works of art, which he aspired to build a life around as an artist. His parents wanted to provide an opportunity for some young people like Rowan, to develop their art and show others the talent they have.

On 20 July 2018, Rowan’s family and friends will hold a memorial service at the Bedford Wellbeing Centre to officially open ‘Rowan’s cosmos’. Rowan’s Cosmos is an outdoor art installation symbolising Rowan’s love of learning and travel, despite becoming more reclusive as his mental health suffered. The artwork created represents planets, stars, celestial terrains and imaginary worlds.

The official opening will be held on what would have been Rowan’s 28th birthday, and will additionally be attended by local MP Mohammad Yasin and councillor Louise King.

We welcome all to see the installation, so please join us at in the garden at the Recovery College to take some time to remember Rowan, and appreciate all the work that the young people of Mind and YMCA Foyer have put in to creating Rowan’s Cosmos.

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Exhibition: Marius Els for World Mental Health Day

What: Visual art exhibition from artist Marius Els
When: 1-4pm, Monday October 10th, 2016
Where: Mind, Haringey, North London

Photographer and artist Marius Els is showing selected work from previous exhibition ‘Seasons of the Mind’, plus a new body of work, ‘A Life Time’, for one day only  at Station House, Haringey, in support of Mind and World Mental Health Day.

Marius combines photography, collage and mixed media to create beautiful and magical works of art. Don’t miss it!

For more information about his work, including an in-depth description of ‘A Life Time’, please visit Marius Els online.

Borderline Arts 8 hour Artathon


Eight Hour Artathon to Tackle Mental Health Stigma

Nine artists are doing an all-nighter to make art for 8-hours straight…
“This Saturday 24th October, while you’ll all be tucked up in your beds, 9 of us are giving up our lovely warm beds for a night to spend 8 hours solid (overnight) creating art to raise money for Borderline Arts! Art will be then auctioned off on November 15th (more information on that to follow soon).”

“We each have a sponsorship page on our Local Giving Page which you can access by clicking here (click on ‘fundraisers’ in the top right corner and click on a name and go from there).”

Donations will help us to:
– Run Art therapy sessions for family/carers/loved ones of BPD
– Run Educational workshops for professionals working with people with BPD
– Run Creative expressive writing workshops for individuals affected by BPD (a compilation of pieces written will be made into a booklet dedicated to Sarah’s Auntie Marian who sadly died from suicide earlier this year)
– Make/show a film about the life of a young woman with BPD
– Raise awareness through other means – online, articles, info stalls, online/actual exhibitions and more…

“Please, please help us if you can.

Many Thanks,

Beccy, Becky, Ben, Gemma, Madeleine, Molly, Nick, Sarah and Vicky”

Event: Art & Music for the Mind, Kingston


‘Sound 1’

What: Art & Music for the Mind
When: Saturday 10th October, 2015
Where: All Saints Church, Kingston upon Thames (see FB link for full details)

Artist TEMPOK got in touch to let us know he is taking part in Kingston Mental Health Festival in support of World Mental Health day on Saturday October 10th, and to share some paintings he created during a workshop in the run-up to this event.

Take a look at the Facebook event page here: Art & Music Festival for the Mind

TEMPOK says his paintings in this post were created whilst “listening to classical music and painting, drawing”, resulting in “an idea inspired by Wassily Kandinsky.”


‘Sound 2’

He goes on to explain that, comically, “not only was there a radio playing pop music in the cafe next door, but everyone was passionately discussing urinals and unmade beds in the actual room, so that didn’t work out too well!” However, despite the distractions, “the interesting thing was that by having this atmosphere of bustling friendliness all around, I felt very nourished and that in itself inspired me to paint these pictures!”


‘Sound 3’

TEMPOK wants to help give the festival a boost the this year, “as, last year, it was dampened by the rain, and it’d be nice if lots of people came to enjoy it this year. Plus, 20% of all sales go to the charity Mind so it’s for a good cause – not to mention giving the artists and musicians, marginalised through mental distress, some well-deserved exposure!

More information can be found on the Mind in Kingston site…
“This year sees the first Kingston Mental Health Festival which celebrates World Mental Health day by holding a range of events for local people. As well as the Mind in Kingston’s annual Arts & Music Festival there will be talks, coffee mornings and wellbeings to suit everyone.

Organisations taking part include: Learn English at Home (LEAH), Kingston Voluntary Action (KVA), Fircroft Trust, Kingston Libraries, Public Health Kingston, RBK Equality & Community Engagement Team and Mind in Kingston.

For a full listings of events, please click here to download the programme (PDF format), or go to the Events Page here.

Where is the Work in the Work of Art?

Opening Event: 19 February, 3 – 5pm
Exhibition continues: 20 February – 10 April
Opening times: Wed – Friday, 10am – 5pm
Gallery and museum open the first and last Saturdays of the month 10am – 5pm

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“A pioneering arts and museum space at the heart of Bethlem Royal Hospital opens to the public on February 19th. Where is the Work in the Work of Art? is our first exhibition in the new gallery. This inaugural exhibition reveals some of the stories, processes and structures behind the art of a diverse group of artists who are connected to the gallery. We will be asking: what takes place before, during and after the making of an artwork? And how are artists enabled to do what they do?

Where is the Work in the Work of Art? takes its lead from our recent Bethlem Salon by the same name. It looks at art’s relationship to labour from several perspectives: cultural theory, art practice and occupational therapy. The aim is to reach beyond art as an object and identify what might be called the ‘bi-products’ of the art process.

What work is for artists and what it could be has been of long debate. Do we consider the making of art to be work when that work is enjoyable? Is it work when the outcome does not take the form of a tangible finished object? Is it work when the work is of second nature to the artist and fully integrated into daily life? Or does the work lie in the minds of the audience, who after encountering the artwork, carry into the world with them new ideas, questions, feelings or forms?

When asked about the title for his recent exhibition at the Bethlem Gallery, The silence of sawn wood, artist P.J Baird said: “It indicates a happening, a poetic image. As you view the work you imagine the process involved, like a form of synesthesia.” Although often seen as a strictly controlled environment to reside in, the hospital can be an enabling context for the production of art; artists may have more time and freedom to work. When it comes to the reception and interpretation of artwork, the hospital context is much more problematic.

Artworks and works of art are predominantly discussed as finished objects viewed through the valorising contexts of galleries and museums. This exhibition looks at work that is not always visible, work that is present in process, failure, experimentation, advocacy and the many other aspects of work that forms and surrounds artistic practice. By making visible some of the usually unseen aspects of artists practice, we hope to give further weight to the work of some of the most dynamic, adaptable, resistant and innovative artists that we know.”

– Sam Curtis, Curator

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The exhibition programme offers several lenses through which to consider artist practice and specific works:

Encounter and dialogue
What kind of encounter takes place between an audience and artists practice? How do artists set up situations for dialogue whether intentionally or unintentionally?

Working under constraints
Whether it’s within the rigorously controlled environment of a psychiatric hospital or the limiting space of home, the exhibition looks at how these artists adapt and evolve their practices to survive and flourish within specific constraints.

Art as a tool
The exhibition will explore how some of the artists use art as a personal tool, arming their practice with a specific use- value, a function in the artists ability to craft his or her own identity.

Methodology and process
Uncovering some of the complex and refined methodologies and processes of artists can tell us something about their focus, their skill and their persistence.

Time
Does more time devoted to making art have a positive effect on an artist’s practice? The Bethlem Gallery acknowledges the importance of time, how time aids the establishing of mutual relationships of trust and respect with artists and the creation of a safe space where together we can experiment artistically.

Support Structures
How are artists enabled to continue practising? What support structures, both formal and informal create the specific conditions for their practise to take place?

Where is the Work in the Work of Art? features:
• Contributions by Albert, Clive, Dan Duggan, Daniel, George Harding, Liz Atkin, Matthew, Max Reeves, OccupationalTherapy Department staff and patients, Patient X, P. J. Baird, Raymond, Rodney, Ronald, Roydell, Steph Bates, Sue B, and Sue Morgan.

• Interviews and documentation of artistic process

• A mapped walk around the hospital site where visitors can discover an evolving array of artist interventions and

remnants of practice.

• An artist-created Wood Library situated within the diverse woodlands on the hospital grounds, open for reading,

borrowing, referencing and workshops.

• A Workshop for Unrealised Projects where unfinished or failed projects will be collectively explored and then remade through shared proposals

• The Bethlem Salon – Making and Unmaking – where invited speakers will discuss art, making and the production of subjectivities within the context of an exhibition showing the artworks resulting from of the Workshop for Unrealised Projects

• A series of talks and workshop to be announced on the gallery website

Address: The Bethlem Gallery, Bethlem Royal Hospital, Monks Orchard Road, Beckenham, Kent BR3 3BX
Travel: Nearest British Rail: Eden Park / East Croydon

Contact: Beth Elliott, Gallery Director, 020 3228 4101 • Email: thebethlemgallery@gmail.com • Website: http://www.bethlemgallery.com