Siris Hill

Siris Hill is a self-taught artist whose creative practice is centred around Renaissance and Baroque inspired figurative painting. His work explores the effects of mental illness and other psychological conditions of the mind on an individual. Focusing on the struggle of perception, he depicts the beauty of individuality, but the strongest message is the struggle of trying to live. ​Siris is a digital fine artist, replicating the textures and movement of oil and acrylic paint.

“I’m Siris Hill. I’m 27. I have suffered from anxiety and depression since my late teens, and, have become somewhat agoraphobic due to the anxiety, which makes it difficult to network with other people. I sometimes find it difficult to share my work. This is caused by past rejection, anxiety about approaching people, and not feeling good enough.

I was diagnosed with Crohn’s disease at birth. I practically lived in hospitals until the age of fifteen when I decided I was sick of them mistreating me. I stopped taking my medication, and have been physically healthy ever since, although I began getting anxiety attacks due to the trauma of my childhood.

I started painting 4 years ago, as a way to relax. Since then it has become a form of meditation for me. I am self-taught and my work portrays the raw feelings and emotions felt living with mental illnesses. It might be difficult for a person living without a mental illness to understand what it’s like for me – I often feel frustrated and isolated.

I love oil painting, but I’m unable to use it due to the fumes and certain materials triggering my anxiety. I taught myself to replicate techniques of Renaissance painters such as Rembrandt. Due to the advancements in technology I’m able to replicate traditional painting almost exactly, the only difference is drying times between layers.

I use a graphics tablet which tracks the movement of a pen that I hold to paint so my hand movements are then replicated on the screen.  Other than that my process is almost exactly like Rembrandt’s, from what I’ve gathered through research at least. I build up a rough sketch to find a composition, fill in light and shadows, work in black and white to realise my forms and then glaze colours on top (although sometimes I work with colour straight away).

Painting is my way of expressing what I can’t talk about. My art may seem dark, but, I feel it reflects the reality other people like me live with day to day.”

To see more of Siris Hill’s work, please visit his website, www.sirishill.co.uk/, Instragram, and Facebook profiles. Siris recently exhibited with ten other artists living with mental ill health. Their self-curated show, Absence, can be viewed online, here.

 

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Exhibition: One Pot Per Day, Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology

What: Visual art exhibition, Private View
When: 29 November, 6-8pm, exhibition continues 30 Nov – 30 Jan 2017
Where: Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, Malet Place, London, WC1E 6BT



The Petrie Museum are delighted to invite you to join them for the Private View of their new exhibition, One Pot Per Day, by Slade School of Fine Art graduate Kate Keara Pelen, on Tuesday 29 November from 6-8pm.

“Every day, for 365 days, from January 1st to December 31st 2015, I produced one soft hand-made vessel using simple crochet techniques. The project came out of the desire to find a manageable way of sustaining a commitment to my creative output during a period when extensive time in the studio was not going to be possible. The vessel-like shape emerged naturally out of experiments in spiral and tubular forms. The notion of a ‘pot’ allowed for sufficient variety and flexibility in the making to keep my attention for twelve months, while still functioning as a coherent collection or family of objects.”
Kate Keara Pelen

Come and meet the artist and see how her practice complements our collections of ancient Egyptian pots. Drinks will be served in the main museum space.

The exhibition will run from 30 Nov 2016 – 30 Jan 2017 at the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology.

 To attend please book at https://onepotperdayprivateview.eventbrite.co.uk

If you have any access requirements please email events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk,
Tel. 0207 679 4138

The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology is part of UCL Culture

Exhibition: Cross-Pollination at Dragon Café

What: Exhibition of visual art from service users and providers
When: May 2-30, Mondays only
Where: Dragon Café, Southwark, London

ARTISTS: PERRY BARCLAY-GODARD – TERENCE WILDE – MARIE-LOUISE PLUM – MIKEY GEORGESON – JAN ARDEN – LAURA GREENWAY – SUSAN MARY GRATWICK – JASMINE SURREAL – TIM BRADFORD – RICHARD CORRIGALL – MEGAN WHINTON – AMIA TOWN – ALICE TURNER – EMMA DUGGAN – HAYLEY HARE

Our next exhibition represents the meeting of minds often described as firmly being ‘in two camps’. From May 2nd until 30th, we will be showing visual art from mental health service users and providers at the Dragon Café in Southwark. We are exploring the dovetailing of mental health service users and providers, and the overlap of being in services and providing a service, with the aim of blurring the lines of ‘Us vs Them’.

There will be a talk from artists Richard Corrigall (SLAM) and Megan Whinton on Monday May 23rd at 5pm.

DRAW! Alternative ways of drawing, Free Space Gallery

What: Drawing workshops, drop-in sessions
When: May 6-27, 2016
Where: Free Space Gallery, KTHC, London, NW5 2BX

Our lead artist, Marie-Louise Plum, is running a series of drawing workshops at Free Space Gallery, Kentish Town Health Centre, from May 6-27 2016. Learn to draw using alternative techniques and unusual materials, including natural objects such as feathers, sticks and material.

These sessions are drop-in, meaning that you can just turn up, but where possible, please book online so we have some idea of numbers. If you can’t make it on the day, that’s okay, just cancel the booking. You can reserve your space at any of the four sessions in May, here.

Sessions run from 2-5pm every Friday during the month of May. No experience necessary, all materials provided. We will have a short break at 3:15pm every week. Refreshments provided.

Mental Spaghetti Roadshow: PRIVATE VIEW – all welcome!

What: Exhibition – private view
Where: Studio 3 Arts, Boundary Road, Barking, IG11 7JR. Tel: 020 8594 7136
When: Friday 10th July, 5:30-9:30pm

Good morning all!

We’re having a private view of our group show, in support of the art workshop residency at Studio 3 Arts in Barking, and you’re invited!

Jan Arden, David Feingold, Lazz Ozerden and Marie-Louise Plum are showing 2D visual art for your delectation. There really is a lot of special artwork on show, in particular a massive wedge of never-seen-before acrylic on canvas from Lazz, and four of Jan Arden’s magnificently detailed, large-scale pen drawings.

The private view is a chance for you to come and see the exhibition out of daily hours, by appointment, in a way. You can meet the folks from Mental Spaghetti, and I’m sure the artists will also be mingling. We’ll have snacks and drinks, both alcoholic and non, of course.

As mentioned, this private view is for the accompanying exhibition to our current residency of workshops at Studio 3 Arts – creative writing and drawing, woodcut relief printmaking and plaster sculpture. Tickets are free and available here.

Any questions, email us. Hope to see y’all there!

Exhibiting artists: Jan Arden | David Feingold | Lazz Ozerden | Marie-Louise Plum

Where is the Work in the Work of Art?

Opening Event: 19 February, 3 – 5pm
Exhibition continues: 20 February – 10 April
Opening times: Wed – Friday, 10am – 5pm
Gallery and museum open the first and last Saturdays of the month 10am – 5pm

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“A pioneering arts and museum space at the heart of Bethlem Royal Hospital opens to the public on February 19th. Where is the Work in the Work of Art? is our first exhibition in the new gallery. This inaugural exhibition reveals some of the stories, processes and structures behind the art of a diverse group of artists who are connected to the gallery. We will be asking: what takes place before, during and after the making of an artwork? And how are artists enabled to do what they do?

Where is the Work in the Work of Art? takes its lead from our recent Bethlem Salon by the same name. It looks at art’s relationship to labour from several perspectives: cultural theory, art practice and occupational therapy. The aim is to reach beyond art as an object and identify what might be called the ‘bi-products’ of the art process.

What work is for artists and what it could be has been of long debate. Do we consider the making of art to be work when that work is enjoyable? Is it work when the outcome does not take the form of a tangible finished object? Is it work when the work is of second nature to the artist and fully integrated into daily life? Or does the work lie in the minds of the audience, who after encountering the artwork, carry into the world with them new ideas, questions, feelings or forms?

When asked about the title for his recent exhibition at the Bethlem Gallery, The silence of sawn wood, artist P.J Baird said: “It indicates a happening, a poetic image. As you view the work you imagine the process involved, like a form of synesthesia.” Although often seen as a strictly controlled environment to reside in, the hospital can be an enabling context for the production of art; artists may have more time and freedom to work. When it comes to the reception and interpretation of artwork, the hospital context is much more problematic.

Artworks and works of art are predominantly discussed as finished objects viewed through the valorising contexts of galleries and museums. This exhibition looks at work that is not always visible, work that is present in process, failure, experimentation, advocacy and the many other aspects of work that forms and surrounds artistic practice. By making visible some of the usually unseen aspects of artists practice, we hope to give further weight to the work of some of the most dynamic, adaptable, resistant and innovative artists that we know.”

– Sam Curtis, Curator

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The exhibition programme offers several lenses through which to consider artist practice and specific works:

Encounter and dialogue
What kind of encounter takes place between an audience and artists practice? How do artists set up situations for dialogue whether intentionally or unintentionally?

Working under constraints
Whether it’s within the rigorously controlled environment of a psychiatric hospital or the limiting space of home, the exhibition looks at how these artists adapt and evolve their practices to survive and flourish within specific constraints.

Art as a tool
The exhibition will explore how some of the artists use art as a personal tool, arming their practice with a specific use- value, a function in the artists ability to craft his or her own identity.

Methodology and process
Uncovering some of the complex and refined methodologies and processes of artists can tell us something about their focus, their skill and their persistence.

Time
Does more time devoted to making art have a positive effect on an artist’s practice? The Bethlem Gallery acknowledges the importance of time, how time aids the establishing of mutual relationships of trust and respect with artists and the creation of a safe space where together we can experiment artistically.

Support Structures
How are artists enabled to continue practising? What support structures, both formal and informal create the specific conditions for their practise to take place?

Where is the Work in the Work of Art? features:
• Contributions by Albert, Clive, Dan Duggan, Daniel, George Harding, Liz Atkin, Matthew, Max Reeves, OccupationalTherapy Department staff and patients, Patient X, P. J. Baird, Raymond, Rodney, Ronald, Roydell, Steph Bates, Sue B, and Sue Morgan.

• Interviews and documentation of artistic process

• A mapped walk around the hospital site where visitors can discover an evolving array of artist interventions and

remnants of practice.

• An artist-created Wood Library situated within the diverse woodlands on the hospital grounds, open for reading,

borrowing, referencing and workshops.

• A Workshop for Unrealised Projects where unfinished or failed projects will be collectively explored and then remade through shared proposals

• The Bethlem Salon – Making and Unmaking – where invited speakers will discuss art, making and the production of subjectivities within the context of an exhibition showing the artworks resulting from of the Workshop for Unrealised Projects

• A series of talks and workshop to be announced on the gallery website

Address: The Bethlem Gallery, Bethlem Royal Hospital, Monks Orchard Road, Beckenham, Kent BR3 3BX
Travel: Nearest British Rail: Eden Park / East Croydon

Contact: Beth Elliott, Gallery Director, 020 3228 4101 • Email: thebethlemgallery@gmail.com • Website: http://www.bethlemgallery.com