TAIESEID

TAIESEID: A Multi-media and oft (accidentally) installation artist with a working practise on mental health, specifically with an autobiographical focus on anorexia and borderline personality disorder.

A recent Fine Art graduate from Liverpool School of Art and Design, I have just undertaken my first international residency at Arts, Letters & Numbers in New York, USA.

I am also a recovering anorexic and bulimic, and current sufferer of borderline personality disorder, anxiety and depression. I have spent large portions of my life in inpatient mental health facilities and my practise focuses on mental health and, mostly, anorexia.”

See more at http://taieseid.com.

 

ARTIST SEEKING EXHIBITION SPACE! READ ON…

“I created the installation ‘Heterotopia’, which focuses on anorexia and the in-between living. It is a sound and film interactive piece, which consists of a 3/5 sided space panelled with reflective silver materials and a ‘squishy floor’.

The film and audio is 9 minutes long, with a 5 min gap between rolls to allow people to explore the squishy floor become ‘comfortable’ before the piece starts. Size wise, it is perhaps the end of a room or even a corridor would work so long as the floor and back wall and ceiling could be completely covered and the two sides left blank for reflections.

Below are some stills from a recent showing of Heterotopia at the Tertium Quid exhibition at the Arts, Letters & Numbers Institute in NY. “

If any of you readers with a suitable space out there think Heterotopia might be appropriate for your programme, please contact Taieseid via her website.

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Micro commission opportunity at The Horsfall

Commission FlyerThe Horsfall Micro Commissions 2017-18

Deadline Friday 5th May 2017

Applications are invited from artists and creative practitioners working in any art form for the 2017/18 Micro Commissions Programme with The Horsfall at 42nd Street.

The Micro Commission programme is a research and development opportunity for creative practitioners working across any art form. Designed to foster experimentation and innovation in creative practice within the realms of young people’s mental health and wellbeing, Micro Commissions enable practitioners to engage with an established mental health charity with its own creative programme and dedicated creative venue; The Horsfall.

We invite applications from creative practitioners from any discipline who wish to explore one of the following:

– The intersections of their practice with young people’s mental health and wellbeing.

– How the history of The Ancoats Art Museum or 87 Great Ancoats Street (the site of The Horsfall) can inspire and inform our arts and mental health practice at The Horsfall (resources are currently being curated into an online collection and can be supplied upon request).

– Ruskin/Horsfall’s vision for Useful and Beautiful art and how this can be reflected in arts and wellbeing work with young people at The Horsfall.

– The natural world in the urban environment and its relationship to young people and mental wellbeing.

You can download the full application guidelines PDF here: The Horsfall Micro Commissions Application Guidelines 2017

About 42nd Street

42nd Street is an innovative Greater Manchester mental health charity committed to supporting young people aged 11-25 years with their emotional well-being and mental health, promoting choice and creativity. With an excellent 35 year reputation, our unique holistic service model combines therapeutic psychological interventions with advocacy and social care. We reach 2000 young people each year via individual therapeutic support, projects and activities, leadership, peer research and a creative programme.

About The Horsfall

The Horsfall is a new venue and creative programme for Manchester, dedicated to improving young people’s mental health and wellbeing and the opening programme of projects, workshops and events will see artists, makers and heritage experts working with young people to reinterpret stories from the past, interrogate their own stories and to imagine new futures.

About the Micro Commissions

The Micro Commissions will be reserved for practitioners who are 35 years of age or under on 1st May 2017.

As this commission programme is conceived as a period of research, testing and experimentation, the only set public outcome is a presentation or sharing about your commission for an audience to be determined by The Horsfall team (including young people and the Creative Producer) and the commission holder.

As well as having access to one floor of The Horsfall for the equivalent of one week, commission holders will have access to 42nd St staff and their expertise in the field of young people and mental health.

It is not necessary for the applicant to consider or plan any direct delivery with young people during the commission period, although we do welcome applications that consider the involvement of young people in some way.

The Horsfall is based in central Manchester and easily accessible by public transport. The building consists of three floors and either the ground or first floors are potentially available for the commission. The ground floor is fully accessible.

Structure

There are two Micro Residencies in 2017 each lasting approximately one week. This can be a block of time or individual days taken over an extended period. Commission holders will receive:

– £500 expenses

– Workspace at The Horsfall

– Support from the Horsfall programme team (creative producer, engagement officer and communications officer)

– Access to support and information from mental health practitioners as necessary and where possible.

Chosen practitioners must have a current DBS at the time of taking up the micro commission. 42nd Street is able to assist in this process if necessary.

How to apply:

Please send the following:

– A one-page statement outlining your practice, your interest in the Commission, and how it will benefit one or more of the following:

– Your work

– Young people

– The Horsfall

– 42nd Street

– Your CV

– Supporting material – This must be in the form of a pdf containing up to 8 images and no larger than 10mb in size. You can include links to work online and your website within this document. If you want to include moving image/sound work in your application please include links to your work online.

There are two commission time slots. These will be confirmed by mutual agreement with the chosen candidates and will be between June 2017 and January 2018.

If you have any further questions about any aspect of the application please feel free to e-mail Julie.McCarthy@42ndstreet.org.uk. Please send applications by e-mail to Julie.McCarthy@42ndstreet.org.uk.

Selection Panels and Timescales

The Micro Commission panel is chaired by Julie McCarthy, Creative Producer for The Horsfall at 42nd Street. The rest of the panel is made up of:

– Two young people from the Creative Agents group at The Horsfall

– A representative from The Kim Lindfield Trust

The deadline for submissions is Friday 5th May at 12 midday.

Successful candidate will be notified by Friday 12th May.

Eligibility

This opportunity is open to creative practitioners working in any discipline at any stage of their

career. The commissions are reserved for practitioners aged 35 years or under on 1st May 2017.

Students in full time education are ineligible to apply.

Feedback

We regret that we are unable to provide feedback on unsuccessful applications.

 

Review: Terence Wilde & Harrison Moore, ‘Shared Insight’


Screen printed t-shirt by Terence Wilde and Harrison Moore. More images and video, below.

Six months ago, artists Terence Wilde and Harrison Moore had never met. Harrison was, and still is, a third year Fine Art student at Central Saint Martins. Terence was, and still is, an established artist and art and textiles instructor at Bethlem Royal Hospital.

Six months later we have arrived at June. Terence and Harrison, together, have produced an impressive range of collaborative work, amassed many hours of filmed discussion and pushed personal boundaries to develop new approaches and methods of working.

Their meeting was the initiative of Outside In, who selected Terence and Harrison to work together on a four month residency, located at Free Space Gallery in Kentish Town, and Central Saint Martins in King’s Cross.

Together, the pair disseminated what it means to be artists working in contemporary London, arriving at their ultimate outcome by going on the creative journey itself. Their collaborative residency culminated in an two-floor exhibition at Free Space Gallery. The exhibition demonstrated their working methods, films, scripts, photographs, modified t-shirts and artworks created during their four months together.

Back in January, prior to the residency, I met Terence at the Tate Modern to discuss an upcoming Mental Spaghetti exhibition he took part in. He’d just been given the news that he would be awarded the residency opportunity. It was a lot to digest, he was excited and apprehensive, worried whether he would live up to the opportunity, and work well with the other artist involved.

The next time I saw Terence, he had met Harrison, and discovered that not only did they get on well, but Harrison had much the same worries as Terence, in relation to their place in art, and how the residency, and working together, would go.

Being given this opportunity, offering great potential, to explore and create, knowing that at the same time it will expose more of who we are, would make anyone nervous. Adding to the mix, a collaboration with someone, who, at the point of entry, is a stranger, to lay everything bare and work together, both responsible for the outcome, is without a doubt daunting proposition.

That was the beauty of this collaboration – documenting and sharing feelings of of identity and sense of self that we all feel, but often think we don’t have the license to express. That we must only succeed and absolutely not show any misgivings about our process.

I found the confessional side of Terence and Harrison’s process so profound; the majority of their intimate discussions based on life experience, such as love, loss, mental states and identity, so accessible to all of us, as vulnerable as we are underneath, in comparison to the considered image of who we are, that we present on the outside. An armour of sorts.

Terence and Harrison had produced, quite organically, through their discussions and discovery of each other, soundbites, slogans and ideas that allowed a pointed insight to the human condition. It was entirely human – inquisitive, touching, indecisive, self-assured, self-doubting, playful and serious.

I hope to see more from Terence and Harrison, working together, although not physically together at the residency any more. They have a collaborative blog, which I hope they will keep updating, now that they have moved on to new projects. To see more of their work, please take a look at their websites: Terence Wilde & Harrison Moore.

Background to the residency

“In 2014 Outside In worked with the University of Chichester to pair an Outside In artist with an MA Fine Art student to see how they could learn from each other in both life and in artistic practice.
Such a fruitful relationship occurred that Outside In wanted to replicate it with other university students and Outside In artists. The Kentish Town Health Centre approached Outside In about the possibility of a residency, and Outside In then approached Central Saint Martins to be part of the collaboration.
Proposals were received from both current and alumni students from the Fine Art Department. Harrison and Terence have got on really well, worked across many new disciplines and have developed their own artistic practice and ways of thinking. It seems that both artists will be leaving the process in a better mind set, but also as friends.”
Outside In
Blog address: http://www.sharedinsite.wordpress.com

Exhibition: Shared Insight

What: Exhibition, following a four-month collaborative residency
When: May 13 – 27, Private View 12th May
Where: Free Space Gallery, Kentish Town, London

Shared Insight showcases the work of artists Harrison Moore and Terence Wilde.

Harrison is a third year Central Saint Martins Fine Art Student and Terence is an artist associated with the Outside In project at Pallant House Gallery.

The two artists have been part of a four month residency at Kentish Town Health Centre, exploring shared insights of what it means to be artists working in contemporary London.

This exhibition, across two floors, shows their working methods, films, scripts, photographs, modified t-shirts and artworks created during their four months together.

Background to the residency

In 2014 Outside In worked with the University of Chichester to pair an Outside In artist with an MA Fine Art student to see how they could learn from each other in both life and in artistic practice. Such a fruitful relationship occurred that Outside In wanted to replicate it with other university students and Outside In artists.

The Kentish Town Health Centre approached Outside In about the possibility of a residency, and Outside In then approached Central Saint Martins to be part of the collaboration. Proposals were received from both current and alumni students from the Fine Art Department.

Harrison and Terence have got on really well, worked across many new disciplines and have developed their own artistic practice and ways of thinking. It seems that both artists will be leaving the process in a better mind set, but also as friends.

Blog address: www.sharedinsite.wordpress.com

Outside In blog article on the collaboration.

“Please join us to celebrate the work created during this time. Opening this evening, Thursday 12 May 6:30-9pm.”